Course

MICROBIOLOGY R100; 33823; 3 credits

Semester

Spring, 2014

Meeting time & Place

Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45 AM (LA-8)

Instructor

Dr. Michael Nicholson

Contact information

e-mail = dr@michael-nicholson.com

web page = http://www.michael-nicholson.com

Office phone = (805) 498-8451 - do not use any other contact phone number, unless specifically provided by the instructor

Office hours

By appointment after class and/or immediately before or after class

 

Contact Information:  E-mail within the first week of classes, and include the following specific information in your subject heading so that your message is appropriately filed for the semester: “Last Name, First Name, Micro”

 

Description: “This course is an introduction to the structure, metabolic activities, utility and pathogenicity of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and viruses. The topics will include distribution, metabolism, molecular genetics, biotechnology, immunity, cancer, probiotics and the physical/chemical methods used in control of microbes and cellular pathogens. The principles of disease transmission, prevention and immunity will also be presented. The diversity of the microbial world and its applications to improving human health and quality of life are emphasized.” [From course catalogue].  Lecture and Laboratory are separate in this course for grading purposes.  Lecture will be divided into lectures, presentations, and discussion.  Presentations will most likely be video.  Discussions will be open and participation will be expected; try to have constructive things to say, especially if discussion subjects are noted in advance.  You are responsible for scheduling Lab separately.

 

Objectives:  At the end of the course, students should be able to (from the course catalogue):

A)  Describe the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

B)  Compare and contrast eukaryotic cell structure with that of the prokaryote.

C)  Analyze the fluid nature of bacterial taxonomy.

D)  Categorize the basic principles of microbial control.

E)  Summarize the diversity of forms in the microbial world.

F)  Distinguish the diversity of microbial metabolism.

G)  Interpret the immune system's functions and various host defense mechanisms found in the eukaryotes.

H)  Illustrate the principles of disease transmission and prevention.

I)   Demonstrate an understanding of microbial genetics as they relate to microbial evolution, recombinant DNA technologies and biotechnology.

 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):  It is expected that students will be able to list a unique symptom identifier for diseases on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC.gov) current notifiable diseases list.  The list will be available and we will be going over the list in class regularly.  Additionally, students must be able to produce the names of the pathogens causing the diseases that we regularly review.  Assessment of the SLOs will be in a multiple-choice format.  See the following link:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncphi/disss/nndss/PHS/infdis2010.htm

 

Texts:  The required text for this class is:  Tortora et al. Microbiology – Intro, 11th Edition.  Pearson.  Other texts may be used but no direction regarding equivalence will be provided, and the material may not correspond to the course text or the lecture.  Not everything in the book will be covered in lecture.  Likewise, not everything in lecture will be covered by the book.  Some of the material in the book will be skipped completely.  Students are expected to read the text, reading appropriate sections prior to lecture is strongly suggested.  Guidance will be given regarding sections that will be skipped.  Other materials at the book store may prove very useful for studying efforts

 

Tortora: Microbiology – Intro, 11th edition, 2013 cy, Pearson Education, ISBN 9780321733603, Required.

 

Exam Requirements and General Grading:  There will be 4 lecture “exams”, each with up to 50 questions and each worth a total of 155 points (620 grand total).  Exams will be given first thing on the designated exam date, and should require no more than 50 minutes.  There will also be at least 3 lecture quizzes, each with 15 questions and each worth a total of 50 points (150 grand total).  Quizzes will generally be given first thing on the designated quiz date, and will require no more than 10 minutes.  DO NOT MISS THE EXAMS OR QUIZZES because there are no make-up exams or quizzes.  For each exam or quiz, be prepared with a Scantron and a #2 pencil.  The Scantron required for exams is the narrow-format (882-E) with 50 questions on one side.  The Scantron required for quizzes is the small quizzstrip (815-e).  The lowest of the first three exam grades will be replaced with an averaged grade from the remaining three exam grades.  Therefore, if one of the first three exams is missed for any reason it should not severely damage your grade.  Exams are cumulative, and material from previous exams may be covered on subsequent exams.  Quizzes will cover only material that is presented since the previous quiz, and in a general way, to address bigger picture concepts.  Quizzes may focus on CDC diseases and pathogens.  A term paper worth 230 points (23% of grade) will be required as described in a separate section of this syllabus.  The maximum points available is projected to be 1,000 points. The grading scale is 10% (i.e. >90% is an A, 80-89% is a B, 70-79% is a C, etc).

 

Attendance:  Attendance will be taken daily.  Missing classes will negatively impact the course grade.  Positive attendance may contribute to the grade, depending on the circumstances on the attendance date recorded.  If a student misses half of the course, he/she may automatically be DROPPED from the course or receive a failing grade.  Likewise, students who miss eight consecutive days of class may automatically be DROPPED from the course or receive a failing grade.  Failure to attend is NO GUARANTEE of being dropped!  To avoid receiving a failing grade, students who stop coming to class are urged to drop the course on their own, through the registrar, instead of expecting to be automatically dropped.  Again, exams/quizzes are only offered one time, so failure to attend class on days with an exam/quiz will result in an automatic failing grade for the specific exam/quiz, since neither are available for make-up.

 

Academic Honesty:  Cheating is not tolerated and any student found cheating will receive a summary grade of zero on the material at hand.  Academic Dishonesty Reports will be filed as appropriate for a student who performs any acts of cheating.

 

Cell Phones and Other Distractions or Disruptions:  Cell phones represent a distraction.  Their use during lecture is unacceptable, and they must be muted or otherwise silenced during lecture.  Recognizing that emergencies can occur and that some students may have a specific responsibility, if an incoming call must be answered, please exit the classroom to do so.  During exams and quizzes, cell phones MUST be turned off, so students with responsibilities to others must prepare for a temporary break in communications at these times.  Other disruptions may be interpreted as (to name a few examples) excessive attention to or reliance on messaging/paging, texting, casual conversation during lecture, dining in the classroom, and using computers for purposes not directly related to the course material at-hand.  Students who choose to ignore cell phone rules or who decide to engage in distracting or disruptive activity may be summarily dismissed from class, and may therefore miss points related to the forced departure.

 

Educational Assistance Center (EAC):  Students with disabilities, whether physical, learning, or psychological, who believe that they may need accommodations in this class, are encouraged to contact the EAC as soon as possible to ensure that accommodations are implemented in a timely fashion.  Authorization, based on verification of disability, is required before any accommodation can be made.  The phone number for the EAC is (805) 986-5800 ext 5830 and they are located in the Student Services Building (behind business office and admissions and records).

 

Term Paper:  A term paper of 7-8 pages is required for the course.  The paper is to summarize three review papers focusing on a single microorganism of your choice.  See the Micro R100 Term Paper document for information about this component.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


General Schedule

MICR R100 (3.00 Units)

Principles of Microbiology

CRN 33823

Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45 AM (LA-8)

 

Week

Date

Subject

Text Chapter

Notes

Mon, 1/6

First day of classes

1

Tue, 1/7

Introduction

1

Late registration

Thu, 1/9

Chemistry

2

2

Tue, 1/14

Microscopy

3

Add codes needed

Thu, 1/16

Microscopy

3

Subject ID’d

Fri, 1/17

Last day to add/drop w/o "W"

Mon, 1/20

MLK Birthday

No Class

3

Tue, 1/21

Cell Structure/Function

4

Quiz 1

Thu, 1/23

Cell Structure/Function

4

Lit Review

4

Tue, 1/28

Exam 1

Thu, 1/30

Metabolism

5

5

Tue, 2/4

Metabolism

5

Thu, 2/6

Growth

6

Quiz 2

6

Tue, 2/11

Controlling Growth

7

Notes Due

Thu, 2/13

Exam 2

7

Tue, 2/18

No Class

Thu, 2/20

No Class

8

Tue, 2/25

Innate Immunity

16

Thu, 2/27

Adaptive Immunity

17

9

Tue, 3/4

Adaptive Immunity

17

Thu, 3/6

Microbial Genetics

8

10

Tue, 3/11

Microbial Genetics

8

Thu, 3/13

Biotechnology

9

11

Tue, 3/18

Classification

10

Quiz 3

Thu, 3/20

Classification

10

12

Tue, 3/25

Prokaryotes

11

Thu, 3/27

Prokaryotes; Eukaryotes

11; 12

Draft Due

13

Tue, 4/1

Spring  Break

No Class

Thu, 4/3

Spring  Break

No Class

14

Tue, 4/8

Eukaryotes

12

Thu, 4/10

Viruses; Epidemiology

13;14

15

Tue, 4/15

Epidemiology

14

Thu, 4/17

Exam 3

16

Tue, 4/22

Microbial Pathogenicity

15

Thu, 4/24

Immunology

18; 19

Fri, 4/25

Last day to drop with "W"

17

Tue, 4/29

CDC & Microbial Diseases

21; 22

Thu, 5/1

CDC & Microbial Diseases

23; 24

18

Tue, 5/6

CDC & Microbial Diseases

25; 26

Paper Due

Thu, 5/8

Antimicrobials

20

19

Tue, 5/13

Final Exam Date; 10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Finals Begin

Mon, 5/19

Last day of Finals